Adam Adamant Lives! Reviews Ep 11

Hagan takes an episode by episode look at the Classic 1960′s British spy/ hero series Adam Adamant Lives!

This is Adam Adamant Lives Series 1 Episode 11- Death by Appointment.

Adam Adamant Lives! is owned by the BBC

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6 Comments

  1. So, yeah, impale a guy’s wife on his sword and then slice his throat open slowly… there are few other moments I’ve ever been speechless with any TV show/movie. And to think I thought kid’s shows were wimpy today compared to the ones I grew up with. Cold, Adamant, just cold.

    If I promise to knock you out will you escort me to the club this weekend?

  2. I’m dreadfully sorry, but I absolutely have to disagree with the notion of you being “shit at that sort of thing”. In fact, your skills in this regard, by all empiric measures, have to be categorized as fully non-shit.

    That said, I still thoroughly enjoyed this review as well as the madness of the source material. Also, the primary villain of the episode kind of calls for inclusion in the Nigel Thornberry meme, doesn’t he?

  3. I enjoy the joke about the Chapman / Sellers commando freak baby. If children didn’t freak me out so much, I’d totally clone myself one.

  4. Look up “short selling” on Wikipedia. I’m far, far from an expert, but It sounds to me like their scam was to engineer stock price crashes (via murder) to milk via short selling. Short selling is a little controversial, but it’s not illegal or a scam, as I understand it. The crime/scam would be the price manipulation and murder parts.

    • Actually, looking at it again, it’s not short selling, though it does have some similarities. Short selling is when you borrow something from a friend, sell it, wait for the market value to drop, then buy it back for less than you sold it for, and return it to your friend. If you’re successful, you make a little profit, and your friend need never know his stuff even left your possession (this is only ethical with fungible goods, of course).

      What they’re doing is selling the deed/title to something they don’t have yet at current market price, and then engineering a price crash so they can buy the real thing at a lower price then they sold it for to pass off as the original sale. It could work in the case of stocks, since they’re an intangible commodity: the broker/scammer only has to keep up the illusion of ownership for the short duration of the switcheroo since there’s nothing for the mark to physically take delivery on.

      One might ask why they don’t just sell fake stocks and not bother with the killing and the buying of real stocks, but this way their fraud is more secure. If someone buys fraudulent stocks, they’re gonna find out about it eventually, and you’ll have to pull up stakes, change your name, and move on. But if you can replace the fraudulent stocks with real ones before anyone can find out, then no one’s the wiser, and you can stay in place and continue to play the “good” legit broker indefinitely.

      You wouldn’t actually have to kill anyone or muck with any companies to pull something like this. Passive insider information alone would be enough, which is why insider trading is such a big deal ethically. Killing/sabotage in this case is just a way for the scammer to manufacture insider info for themselves when they don’t have an actual inside source.

      At least that’s how I understand it. As I said, I’m no expert.

      • Sorry, but the first poster was right.
        The thing to understand is that buying/selling and borrowing/lending have different settlement cycles. In the US, buying settles in t+3, that is to say, three days after the transaction. The UK has a similar cycle.
        Borrows/loans, on the other hand, are same day settlement, that is to say, you get the shares the day you make the deal.
        So in a short, you make a sale, wait three days, borrow shares to deliver the sale, then buy shares to return the loan at your leisure (generally, taking more than 17 days to return a loan can result in some penalties or a buy in).
        So yeah, minus the murder, the villain’s plan is perfectly legal.


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