A Quick Guide to Classic Who- Season 21

Hagan is doing a guide to Classic Doctor Who. The whole thing! This is Season 21.

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27 Comments

  1. The only good stories with Davros bar genesis are in BFA imho

    • Certainly I, Davros and Davros are well worth a listen.

      • I’ve heard “Davros” by Lance Parkin a number of times, and I think it’s probably the best BF audio to feature the character. “I, Davros” was pretty excruciating (although to be fair, I’ve only heard parts one, two and four), and I found the whole I, Claudius take appallingly done, with far too much being staked on Rory Jenkins’ performance, who played the young Davros as if he were a plank of wood. Also, once again, none of these productions have any real connection to the Davros we saw in “Genesis if the Daleks,” being more a riff on the rather boring, one dimensional megalomaniac we get from “Destiny of the Daleks” onwards.

  2. Poor Colin Baker, I feel so sorry for him. He should have had a Castrovalva or Power of the Daleks level introduction instead of the sludge that is Twin Dilemma.

  3. Another very good instalment. Here are my comments.

    “[‘Warriors of the Deep’] was a mess behind the scenes and apparently came close to being shelved entirely.”

    The problems were caused by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher calling a snap General Election for June 14th 1983. It caught the BBC planners on the hop, and recording space had to be re-allocated for the election coverage. This meant that either the story had to be abandoned, or the first recording block had to be brought forward a week. Having lost a story the previous year due to industrial action, Producer, John Nathan-Turner didn’t want the same thing to happen again. This also caused problems for the Visual Effects Department, who were concerned that the Myrka wouldn’t be ready in time. When it turned up on set, it was still covered in wet paint.

    “The Doctor takes Tegan to visit her grandfather in the village of Little Hodcombe.”

    This is the third member of Tegan’s family we’ve met. Aunty Vanessa appears in ‘Logopolis,’ cousin Colin in ‘Arc of Infinity,’ and now here we get granddad Andrew Verney in ‘The Awakening’. It just so happens that all these people end up encountering Alien beings/devices. Did this continue after Tegan left the Tardis? Did she go and visit great aunt Maud only to discover that she was being mentally controlled by the Zarbi? (Get it? Great Aunt! Zarbi. Great ant? Oh, please yourselves.)

    “They are the Tractators- an insectoid-ish race that were responsible for the near genocide of Turlough’s race.”

    What a convenient coincidence. I wonder if any of Tegan’s relatives have met the Tractators? Perhaps her disreputable uncle on her father’s side was helped to escape by one of them tunnelling up through the floor of his Australian prison cell?

    “This is one of the most violent stories in Classic Who.”

    There are 59 deaths in “Resurrection of the Daleks,” which is more than you get in The Terminator (45 deaths) and Terminator II: Judgment day (53 deaths).

    “It weirdly has a scene where the doctor intends to gun Davros down but in the end doesn’t…Not because he doesn’t want too, but because he hesitates a bit.”

    However, later the fifth Doctor is seen blowing up Daleks without a second thought. Clearly, he’s racist against green blobs. Kaldor City review can be found here: http://www.kaldorcity.com/features/articles/resurrection.html

    “Alas the healing flames get turned to not-heal and [the Master] apparently burns to death. Turlough decides to leave and the Doctor kills Kamelion.”

    So the 5th Doctor stands back and allows the Master to burn to death. He then shoots Kamelion with the Master’s Tissue Compression Eliminator, but in the previous story, he can’t bring himself to shoot Davros. WTF?

    Here’s the KC review of “The Caves of Androzani”: 
    http://www.kaldorcity.com/features/antecedents/androzani.html

    “They get stuck in a conflict between an evil and theatrical corporation and an evil subterranean supervillain who really wants to fuck Peri.”

    “Starting off a whole series of stories where everyone want to fuck Peri, including the Cryons in ‘Attack of the Cybermen’ and a sex crazed tree in ‘The Mark of the Rani.’

    “and there’s a really shit Magma Beast running around.”

    The Magma Beast didn’t appear in Holmes’ original script for “The Caves of Androzani” (working title “Chain Reaction”). He was asked to add it by the production team. Here’s why***:

    SAWARD: Well, Bob, we’ve read your script.

    HOLMES: What do you think?

    SAWARD: John and I both feel it’s very good. Certainly the best story of the season… and that’s where the problem lies.

    HOLMES: Sorry, but I’m not following you.

    SAWARD: Well, we think it’s a bit too good for current Doctor Who. It makes the rest of us look like talentless hacks.

    HOLMES: So…?

    SAWARD: So Bob, we want you to put a monster into it.

    HOLMES: What kind of a monster?

    SAWARD: A big ferocious monster with teeth. John has even come up with a name for it. He wants you to call it the Magma Beast.

    HOLMES: Would you also like me to give it some crappy dialogue? Something like, “Ooh, a tasty Time Lord. I’m going to gobble you up, and then I’m going to fuck Peri.”

    SAWARD: No, no… we just want it to roar.

    HOLMES: Roar? That’s all? Sorry Eric, but how is this Magma Beast going to ruin my script?

    SAWARD: Because we are only going to tell the Visual Effects Department about it five days before we start filming. Which is less time than they had to do the Myrka, and look at the fucked up mess they made of that. We’re also going to tell them to make it look like the Chewits monster.

    (http://chewits.co.uk/chews/the-muncher-menace-part-5/)

    HOLMES: Jesus Christ!

    SAWARD: Could have been worse. John was thinking of Bertie Bassett. Anyway, if I can get the rewrites finished by Monday morning, that’ll give me time to do a bit of ham-fisted tinkering and perhaps stick something in about celery.

    HOLMES: Righty-ho.

    SAWARD: Oh, and Bob? No more good script, eh?

    *** Everything from here on is a pack of lies.

  4. The Caves’ is properly the best finale for any Doctor.

    Turlough was a good idea for a companion but after his arc ended in the last series he seemed to just stay the same. I thought he might become a little more noble.

    I loved Tegan’s goodbye because it’s a reaction that’s very natural reaction. I’m surprised companions don’t suffer from PTSD considering how many horrible deaths they witness.

    and no, I didn’t even notice the costume difference.

  5. The “Ressurection of the Daleks” link isn’t connecting, so here it is again:
    http://www.kaldorcity.com/features/articles/ressurection.html

  6. You have a lot of cool details and analogies on these things Diamanda. I really enjoy your videos, and I hope that you’re enjoying making them too. 🙂 Doctor Who does seem to have been quite violent in this season, which carries onto the next one unfortunately (good thing Tegan got out while she did).

    Something about Kamelion I don’t get is why they didn’t just ditch the initial robot idea when they found that the maker/operator died and the robot was near inoperable. They could keep Kamelion as a robot mind – just have another actor portray the robot stuck as a human or somesuch, bound by the Doctor’s morality but influenced by everyone else, and still able to shape change should the story call for it. Come to think on it, they may have taken some inspiration from the idea for Big Finish’s C’rizz, an emotional chameleon who basically absorbed personality traits (and personalities) from everyone around him. Alas, not a terribly great number of stories used that either.

    Personally, I’m glad that Five and Peri got a lot more stories together with Big Finish, not just the two on-screen ones (I’m counting both Peri’s meeting the Doctor and Five’s departure from the series). Not only did it give Peri more time to really adjust to time travel and be more willing to not collapse and wonder what’s going on in her life in the Twin Dilemma, but but she also got to travel with a nearly-was-Pharoh in Erimem. Plus, Nichola Bryant got to do the whole companion-looks-the-same-as-another-person shtick Nyssa got, except it was done by audio and miss Bryant got to use her normal accent for that part.

    • Or if they had to have the robot, just design a friggin costume and have an actor play the part.

      • This is missing the point of why Kamelion appeared in the first place. JNT and Saward were approached to see if they’d like the robot to feature in the show. They were given a demonstration and they were impressed. A script was written tailored to its abilities, and then a second story was written to feature the robot one final time. However, prior to the filming of the first Kamelion story, the chap who created it and operated it was killed in a boating accident. How could anyone have predicted that happening? Then Kamelion’s next, and final, adventure is cancelled due to a strike. Again, how could anyone have seen that coming? The problem now was that having introduced the robot with much fanfare, they were stuck with it until it could be written out, but that wasn’t going to happen in “Resurrection of the Daleks,” as Saward had rewritten his script to cut Kamelion out. So a new script had to be written and the unlucky guy to be stuck with having to write it was Peter Grimwade, who had no real choice in the matter as he was already in JNT’s bad books, and so had to make Saward happy if he wanted any more work on Doctor Who. However, what he didn’t know about Kamelion was that it was cursed. “Plant of FIre” would be Grimwade’s last script for Doctor Who, as a short time later he died. Kamelion’s introductory story “The King’s Demon’s” was also the last script for Doctor Who from author Terrance Dudley, as he also died a short time later. The trail of dead goes on for anyone who wants to Google it.

  7. Warriors of the Deep – Utter and total mess!

    Resurrection of the Daleks – not my favorite Dalek story, but I really enjoy this one, as well as seeing Davros again. Personally, my favorite Davros is the one from Remembrance of the Daleks. He has probably the best lines in that one.

    Planet of Fire – I thought this one was pretty good. Not only that, but seeing how the show used Chameleon on the end of part one by revealing the Master was one of the best plot twists that the show has ever offered.

    The Caves of Androzani – I thought this was good, and I have yet to show it to my brother. I was really unaware for the longest time that this was considered to be the best story in the show’s history until I saw SF Debris review of…

    ….*sigh*, the Twin Dilemma – I wanted to avoid watching this story for my life. The only reason for why I watched this was because I ruined my friend’s copy of the Five Doctors special edition disk. So, as for my punishment, I bought him the Five Doctors, and I had to watch this episode all the way through with him. After we were done, I told my friend that it felt like it never ended and it was only 99 minutes long. He already destroyed the DVD box for it, and he destroyed the DVD while we were running to catch the next bus.

    Anyway, I have watched your review of The Twin Dilemma, and I always wanted to call you out on the whole planets being close to each other. As if no other story within the sci-fi genre has ever done that before! Plus, the only reason why the 26 planets didn’t crash into each other was because the Doctor said in the Atraxi Proclamation (I hope I spelled that right) that they were being hold, and it was figured out that the Daleks were the ones holding the 27 planets all together! I know I might be leaving some else out, and I know I might get pooped on my head for defending the Stolen Earth and Journey’s End on this website.

    • Davros is a great creation… in “Genesis of the Daleks”. All subsequent appearances diminish him. His survival is not convincing and his portrayal is at odds with how he appeared previously. No longer the Machiavellian scientist/politician, who sets out to defeat the Thals and ends up, to his horror, creating death incarnate, he has instead been turned into a rather boring and faintly ridiculous meglomanic, who wants to declare war on the universe for no other reason than the fact it’s there.

      • Davros didn’t want to declare war on the universe for no reason. He wanted to declare war on the universe to have the Daleks become the masters of the universe. He wanted to prove to everyone that the Daleks are the dominant species who deserves to live, and finds everyone else inferior.

      • In “Genesis of the Daleks” Davros has three aims. 1/ Defeat the Thals. 2/ Maintain his power base. 3/ Save the Daleks. Although the analogy with the virus reveals a philosophy that will lead to universal conflict, he hasn’t entirely made the connection himself. When the Daleks start to exterminate everyone in the bunker, Davros is horrified. He tries to argue for the lives of the loyal scientists, and when that fails sacrifices his own life in an attempt to destroy the monsters he has created. Basically, every Davros story after this one is a travesty.

      • You make a few points here that I agree with, but I actually don’t think that Davros’ later appearances are all that different from his character. In their first encounter, the Doctor asked Davros what he would do if he had a vial of a highly contagious virus that would kill all live it came across – Davros basically said he’d crush the capsule and release the virus in an instant. Nothing in the rest of the episode or episodes since disprove that. The only “horror” he has at the Daleks is that they’re killing him and everyone of use to him. He never makes the claim that the Kaleds are people, that the scientists are vital, nor does he show any remorse. He just seems surprised the Daleks are going against his instructions, oblivious to the hole he made in their conditioning (they must exterminate all that is not Dalek, which includes him because he is simple a disabled Kaled, even if he is their creator).

        Don’t forget, Davros made the Daleks through and through – whether or not he developed the idea for them (the Big Finish story “Davros” heavily implies that he plagiarized the idea from a student of his when he was able bodied and had her framed and killed) he put in all the hate and drive to them to exterminate ALL who wasn’t a Dalek. Not to kill the Thals – just to kill everyone and everything not like them. As Davros is a genius on some level, he knew the Daleks would go after anyone else not a Dalek long after the war was over, and he gave the Thals information on how to likewise destroy the Kaleds. Davros has no love for his people, and the reason he didn’t realize the aforementioned hole in the Daleks’ conditioning was probably because he expected his status as their creator to supersede their programming. As his later appearances would show, he didn’t make this mistake with any Daleks he created himself.

      • “You make a few points here that I agree with, but I actually don’t think that Davros’ later appearances are all that different from his character. In their first encounter, the Doctor asked Davros what he would do if he had a vial of a highly contagious virus that would kill all live it came across – Davros basically said he’d crush the capsule and release the virus in an instant. Nothing in the rest of the episode or episodes since disprove that. The only “horror” he has at the Daleks is that they’re killing him and everyone of use to him.”

        I’ve already covered this in the above post, but I’ll go over it again in more detail. Here’s the virus scene:

        DOCTOR: Davros, if you had created a virus in your laboratory, something contagious and infectious that killed on contact, a virus that would destroy all other forms of life, would you allow its use?
        DAVROS: It is an interesting conjecture.
        DOCTOR: Would you do it?
        DAVROS: The only living thing, a microscopic organism reigning supreme. A fascinating idea.
        DOCTOR: But would you do it?
        DAVROS: Yes. Yes. To hold in my hand a capsule that contains such power, to know that life and death on such a scale was my choice. To know that the tiny pressure on my thumb, enough to break the glass, would end everything. Yes, I would do it! That power would set me up above the gods. And through the Daleks, I shall have that power!

        Okay, key points are the Doctor’s statement that the virus would ‘destroy all other forms of life,’ and Davros’ assertion that once the glass had been broken the virus would be the ‘only living thing, a microscopic organism, reigning supreme.’ Clearly, the virus would also kill the creator of the virus, but Davros doesn’t seem to care, however, we then have this:

        DAVROS: Release me.
        DOCTOR: No, Davros.
        DAVROS: Don’t touch that switch.
        DOCTOR: Why not?
        DAVROS: It controls my life support systems. I could not survive thirty seconds without them.
        DOCTOR: Order the destruction of the incubator section.
        DAVROS: Destroy the Daleks? Never.
        (The Doctor presses the little black switch, and an alarm goes off. Davros starts to crumple. The Doctor presses it again and he revives.)
        DOCTOR: I mean it, Davros. Next time I press that switch, it stays pressed. Now give the order!
        DAVROS: Even if I do this, there will be no escape for you.
        DOCTOR: I’ll take that chance. Now give the order.
        DAVROS: Press the communicator switch.
        (The Doctor does so.)
        DAVROS: This is Davros. Elite unit seven will go to the incubator room. All survival maintenance systems are to be closed down. The Dalek creatures are to be destroyed.

        Here, the Doctor is putting their philosophical discussion to the test, and Davros fails it. Like many Nazi eugenicists before him, he adopts a monstrous theory but when the consequences involve themselves, or people known to them personally, they buckle.

        “He never makes the claim that the Kaleds are people, that the scientists are vital, nor does he show any remorse.”

        Well, I don’t agree. And here’s why:

        DALEK: All inferior creatures are to be considered the enemy of the Daleks and destroyed.
        DAVROS: No, wait! Those men are scientists. They can help you. Let them live. Have pity!
        DALEK: Pity? I have no understanding of the word. It is not registered in my vocabulary bank. Exterminate!

        Davros is asking for pity, not for himself (as “Remembrance” will have it) but for the other scientists. Davros understands the concept of pity, and here he feels it for his fellow Kaleds, the ones who, like Nyder, remained loyal to him.

        We also have this:

        DAVROS: No more? Kravos, will you betray me? … I saved your life once. In your chest is a tiny instrument which I designed. It keeps your heart beating. Will you now turn that heart against me?

        And then a little later:

        DAVROS: This is your last chance. Move to join me now or suffer the consequences.
        GHARMAN: Why don’t you just accept the fact that you have lost.

        Even though everyone who intends to side with Davros has done so, he still pleads for more of them to join him. He knows that everyone who refuses will be exterminated on his order, but he still wants to make absolutely sure that he has found ‘those men who were truly loyal to me.’ Although Davros accuses the Doctor of being ‘afflicted with a conscience,’ and calls it a ‘weakness’ that should be ‘eliminated,’ Davros also has a conscience. The camera script says, ‘Davros finally realizes the monster he has created. he spins his chair and moves swiftly to the destruct button.’

        We are told earlier by Davros himself that ‘if any one of you would destroy everything that we have ever achieved, then here is a destruct button. Press it, and you will destroy this bunker and everything in it. Only this room will remain. Press it and you will wipe out our entire race, destroy the Daleks forever.

        So, this isn’t the situation we later have in ‘Resurrection of the Daleks,’ where Davros wants to destroy the extent Daleks and start again with a new strain that will just obey him, here Davros wants to destroy the Daleks permanently. Full stop. Once Davros presses that button, the surviving Daleks in the room will kill him, but Davros tries it anyway.

        “He just seems surprised the Daleks are going against his instructions, oblivious to the hole he made in their conditioning (they must exterminate all that is not Dalek, which includes him because he is simple a disabled Kaled, even if he is their creator).”

        Well, Davros isn’t ‘just surprised’ by that, but in essence, what you have written here is correct. Contrary to what the Doctor tells the Kaled council, Davros has in fact failed to ‘perpetuate himself in his machine.’ It’s true that Davros ‘works without conscience, without soul, without pity,’ but these elements within himself have been suppressed, not eliminated. Davros simply exhibits the mindset that has been created by the thousand year war. It is one shared by both Kaleds and Thals and is best demonstrated in the scene following the destruction of the Kaled dome:

        THAL POLITICIAN: Gentlemen, there’s a great deal to be done. I must speak to the people. There must be a victory parade. And as for [the Doctor], he must be punished. No, let us now show that whilst we were ruthless in war, we are generous in victory. Let all prisoners be freed, charges against them dropped. Issue that statement at once.

        The first part of the speech demonstrates a war mentality, in that it talks of victory parades and retribution, but then, on the cusp of that victory, he changes his mind. Although ‘ruthless in war,’ the politician now decides to be ‘generous in victory.’ He is still the same man, but the circumstances have changed. When fighting the Kaleds, the Thal politician would undoubtedly have echoed General Raven’s beliefs:

        RAVON: When victory is ours, we’ll wipe every trace of the Thals and their city from the face of this land. We will avenge the deaths of all Kaleds who’ve fallen in the cause of right and justice, and build a peace which will be a monument to their sacrifice. Our battle cry will be, ‘total extermination of the Thals’!

        What we have here is a dichotomy of circumstance. In war you hate the enemy. You dehumanise them, and accuse them of various depravities. In peace, all of this is forgotten. Davros is a victim of this war mentality.

        The pre-war tunnels that connect the Kaled and Thal cities, mirror the underground tunnel that links the Bunker with the Kaled dome. In the same way the Thals and the Kaleds split off from each other before the war, the Bunker is split off from the Kaled city. Equally, in the same way that political plotting between the Kaleds and the Thals lead finally to military conflict, the Kaled councils attempts take power away from Davros and the Elite, sparks a cataclysm.

        Davros feels no compassion towards the enemy, whoever that enemy happens to be, however, he also equates political loyalty with friendship, and thereby fails to realise that one does not necessarily follow the other, and that empathy is also a factor.

        “Don’t forget, Davros made the Daleks through and through – whether or not he developed the idea for them (the Big Finish story “Davros” heavily implies that he plagiarized the idea from a student of his when he was able bodied and had her framed and killed)”

        I really think that was an appalling idea, and simply pandering to the fact that Raymond Cusick felt, for completely unjustified reasons, bitterness against Terry Nation. This concept should have been red pencilled from the get go.

        “he put in all the hate and drive to them to exterminate ALL who wasn’t a Dalek. Not to kill the Thals – just to kill everyone and everything not like them.”

        I don’t agree. And here’s why:

        RONSON: You see, we believe that Davros has changed the direction of our research into something which is immoral, evil. You see, the Elite was formed to produce weapons that would end this war. We soon saw that this was futile and changed the direction of our research into the survival of our race. But our chemical weapons had already started to produce genetic mutations.

        Therefore, like the Cult of Skaro, the purpose of the bunker was to think outside of the box. What Davros has created is perfectly in tune with the remit he had been given. The Dalek is not only a means of ensuring the survival of the Kaleds, in some form, but also a weapon which will end the war. Ronson’s objections to the Daleks appear to stem, in part, from the ingrained Kaled obsession with racial purity, in that Davros’ ‘ultimate creature’ has been created using similar processes to those which produced the Mutos.

        “As Davros is a genius on some level, he knew the Daleks would go after anyone else not a Dalek long after the war was over,”

        No, he seriously did not. The Bunker was set up fifty years ago by the Kaled government to produce a weapon that would end the war between the Kaleds and the Thals, and by ‘end,’ they meant destroy the Thals forever. Consequently, once twenty Daleks are operational, Davros sends them out to exterminate the Thals, and the war ends. That’s what he’d been instructed to do, and that’s what he does. The fact that he also had to destroy the Kaleds to do it, is academic. As far as Davros is concerned (and Nyder too, don’t forget) the Kaled councillors who wanted to close down the Dalek project were acting, not for the advancement of their species, but simply out of racism and petty power politicking.

        Please also note that the battle that later takes place between the two factions in the bunker, isn’t over the fact that the Daleks are a different species, but rather that Davros has interfered with the mutation and removed the creatures ‘conscience’. This is also the Doctor’s argument, the Daleks have a right to live, it’s the fact Davros has made them pitiless psychopaths that’s the problem, and the reason he’s done this is threefold:

        1/ As Davros is constantly on a war footing, weather fighting the Thals, or the “disloyal” Kaleds, he has no time to reflect on his actions in the same way that the Thal politician had earlier.

        2/ The constant whittling down of his core group means that he becomes more and more reliant on the Daleks to provide him with security.

        3/ Davros believes that loyalty and a common cause are enough to unite himself and the Daleks in alliance, in the same way that he, a crippled mutant, has been accepted and revered by Kaled society. However, this requires empathy, the very thing he is constantly told by society not to feel for the enemy.

        Therefore, the equation follows, if war represents a universal battle for species survival, why would you equip the ultimate species and weapon of war with the ability to empathise with the enemy? It makes no logical sense.

        “he didn’t realize the aforementioned hole in the Daleks’ conditioning was probably because he expected his status as their creator to supersede their programming. As his later appearances would show, he didn’t make this mistake with any Daleks he created himself.”

        Which really doesn’t read. What Davros crates in later stories are basically robots to carry out his dreams of universal destruction. This is diametrically opposite to Davros’ stated aims in ‘Genesis of the Daleks,’ where he says:

        DAVROS: At this very moment, the production lines stand ready, totally automated, fully programmed. The Daleks are no longer dependant on us. The machinery is ready. They are a power in their own right.

        Davros created the Daleks, in part, as a form of immortality, he wanted to live on through his creations (The fact that in later stories Davros appears to be immortal himself, negates this). Equally, the reason why Davros tries to press the destruct button is because he doesn’t recognise himself in the Daleks, as they only represent one aspect of a particular mindset from a time of conflict. This fundemenal mistake has place the Daleks on a permanent war footing which, because they lack empathy, is not something they can ever return from.

        If the real Davros ever came back, he wouldn’t create an army of drones and declare war on the univers; he’s would simply try to give back to the Daleks the one thing he denied he had himself.

  8. Great work once again. I’m kind of dreading the fact that it won’t be too long now before you run out of classic show.

    The post-credit gag was amazing, though. How’d you manage to make this match up so perfectly?

  9. It looks like a post I sent when I was in Rome last week hasn’t registered, so here it is again:

    Another very good instalment. Here are my comments:

    “[‘Warriors of the Deep’] was doomed from the start, it was a mess behind the scenes and apparently came close to being shelved entirely.”

    The problems were caused by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher calling a snap General Election for June 14th 1983. It caught the BBC planners on the hop, and recording space had to be re-allocated for the election coverage. This meant that either the story had to be abandoned, or the first recording black had to be brought forward a week. Having lost a story the previous year due to industrial action, Producer, John Nathan-Turner didn’t want the same thing to happen again. This also caused problems for the Visual Effects Department, who were concerned that the Myrka wouldn’t be ready in time. When it turned up on set, it was still covered in wet paint.

    “The Doctor takes Tegan to visit her grandfather in the village of Little Hodcombe.”

    This is the third member of Tegan’s family we’ve met. Aunty Vanessa appears in ‘Logopolis,’ cousin Colin in ‘Arc of Infinity,’ and now here we get granddad Andrew Verney in ‘The Awakening’. It just so happens that all these people end up encountering Alien beings/devices. Did this continue after Tegan left the Tardis? Did she go and visit great aunt Maud only to discover that she was being mentally controlled by the Zarbi? (Get it? Great Aunt! Zarbi. Great ant? Oh, please yourselves.)

    “They are the Tractators- an insectoid-ish race that were responsible for the near genocide of Turlough’s race.”

    What a convenient coincidence. I wonder if any of Tegan’s relatives have met the Tractators? Perhaps her disreputable uncle on her father’s side was helped to escape by one of them tunnelling up through the floor of his Australian prison cell?

    “This is one of the most violent stories in Classic Who.”

    There are 59 deaths in “Resurrection of the Daleks,” which is more than you get in The Terminator (45 deaths) and Terminator II: Judgment day (53 deaths).

    “It weirdly has a scene where the doctor intends to gun Davros down but in the end doesn’t…Not because he doesn’t want too, but because he hesitates a bit.”

    However, later the fifth Doctor is seen blowing up Daleks without a second thought. Clearly, he’s racist against green blobs. Kaldor City review can be found here:
    http://www.kaldorcity.com/features/articles/resurrection.html

    “Alas the healing flames get turned to not-heal and [the Master] apparently burns to death. Turlough decides to leave and the Doctor kills Kamelion.”

    So the 5th Doctor stands back and allows the Master to burn to death. He then shoots Kamelion with the the Master’s Tissue Compression Eliminator, but in the previous story, he can’t bring himself to shoot Davros. WTF?

    Here’s the KC review of “The Caves of Androzani”: http://www.kaldorcity.com/features/antecedents/androzani.html

    “They get stuck in a conflict between an evil and theatrical corporation and an evil subterranean supervillain who really wants to fuck Peri.”

    “Starting off a whole series of stories where everyone want to fuck Peri, including the Cryons in ‘Attack of the Cybermen’ and a sex crazed tree in ‘The Mark of the Rani.’

    “and there’s a really shit Magma Beast running around.”

    The Magma Beast didn’t appear in Holmes’ original script for ‘The Caves of Androzan’ (working title ‘Chain Reaction’). He was asked to add it by the production team. Here’s why***:

    SAWARD: Well, Bob, we’ve read your script.

    HOLMES: What do you think?

    SAWARD: John and I both feel it’s very good. Certainly the best story of the season… and that’s where the problem lies.

    HOLMES: Sorry, but I’m not following you.

    SAWARD: Well, we think it’s a bit too good for current Doctor Who. It makes the rest of us look like talentless hacks.

    HOLMES: So…?

    SAWARD: So Bob, we want you to put a monster into it.

    HOLMES: What kind of a monster?

    SAWARD: A big ferocious monster with teeth. John has even come up with a name for it. He wants you to call it the Magma Beast.

    HOLMES: Would you also like me to give it some crappy dialogue? Something like, ‘Ooh, a tasty Time Lord. I’m going to gobble you up, and then I’m going to fuck Peri.’

    SAWARD: No, no… we just want it to roar.

    HOLMES: Roar? That’s all? Sorry Eric, but how is this Magma Beast going to ruin my script?

    SAWARD: Because we are only going to tell the Visual Effects Department about it five days before we start filming. Which is less time than they had to do the Myrka, and look at the fucked up mess they made of that. We’re also going to tell them to make it look like the Chewits monster.

    (http://chewits.co.uk/chews/the-muncher-menace-part-5/)

    HOLMES: Jesus Christ!

    SAWARD: Could have been worse. John was thinking of Bertie
    Bassett. Anyway, if I can get the rewrites finished by Monday morning, that’ll give me time to do a bit of ham-fisted tinkering and perhaps stick something in about celery.

    HOLMES: Righty-ho.

    SAWARD: Oh, and Bob? No more good script, eh?

    *** Everything from here on is a pack of lies.

  10. And now, having made the post again, it appears!

  11. As a finale Doctor story, “Caves of Androzani was great; I just thought that “Planet of the Spiders” was slightly better.

    • Cleary what “The Caves of Androzani” was missing was an extended vehicle chase and a planet full of yokels.:p

    • I don’t know about either one of those finale stories. I was never that huge of a fan of Androzani to begin with (which I still think its good), but I also don’t recall any other good finale story after that either that I have saw. The Parting of Ways is still overrated for me, The End of Time was a disaster, and I still don’t know how to feel about Time of the Doctor. That last one just didn’t leave an impact on me as it was suppose to do. The only finale stories that I have seen are The War Games, Logopolis, and The Caves of Androzani. I won’t count The Ultimate Foe or Survival, since I don’t see either one of them as appropriate finales.

      Actually, now that I think about it, I will say that I truly love Night of the Doctor as my personal favorite. It didn’t try too hard, wasn’t overwhelmed in any way, and it was great to see Paul McGann back to conclude his run. And I almost forgot about the War Doctor’s part in Day of the Doctor. I thought there could ha been a better way of why he regenerated.

      • “The Parting of Ways is still overrated for me,”

        I think that story is excellent. Here’s my review:
        http://www.kaldorcity.com/features/articles/badwolf.html

        “The End of Time was a disaster,”

        Yes it was. Utterly dreadful. One of the worse Doctor Who stories in the history of the programme.

        “and I still don’t know how to feel about Time of the Doctor.”

        Bit of a mixed bad, with good and bad elements in equal proportion.

        “The only finale stories that I have seen are The War Games,”

        Not keen on this one because it tries to rewrite Doctor Who history, and does it very badly. Also, it’s a story that would ultimately lead to “The Invasion of Time,” “Arc of Infinity,” and “Trial of a Time Lord.”

        “Logopolis,”

        Like this one. Although it’s not perfect.

        “The Caves of Androzani.”

        I think that’s the best regeneration story we’ve had so far. It actually made me care about a Doctor I hadn’t really been too keen on.

      • Not keen on this one because it tries to rewrite Doctor Who history, and does it very badly. Also, it’s a story that would ultimately lead to “The Invasion of Time,” “Arc of Infinity,” and “Trial of a Time Lord.”

        – IAnd come to think of it, this wasn’t really a regeneration story, now that I have discovered season 6B. Plus, I have never seen Invasion of Time, but I don’t have too many problems wiht “Arc of Infinity” or “Trial of a Timelord.” I can see why some people don’t like those two, but I personally like them just fine.

  12. “come to think of it, this wasn’t really a regeneration story, now that I have discovered season 6B.”

    This is a very good point, which means that as “The War Games” is considered a regeneration story by the majority of fandom and the BBC, then Season 6b can only be a minority fan theory.

    “Plus, I have never seen Invasion of Time”

    Lucky you.:p


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