Twatty New Who Review- A Good Man goes to War

A GOOD MAN GOES TO WAR TWATTY WHO REVIEW

The unrestrained Id of a fan is aimed at the worst episodes of Doctor Who, This time its ‘A Good Man goes to War’.

*Recorded this while coming down with a cold and while rushing to get it done before my camera died. I (barely) made it. Woulda done some retakes otherwise. Sorry about the rough quality of some of my voice overs.

Advertisements

55 Comments

  1. Excellent work, especially considering the circumstances. There was a point or two when I fell into a feedback loop of laughing. When I first watched “A Good Man Goes to War”, I had missed a whole bunch of prior episodes and saw some out of order, so it didn’t fully hit me how incredibly bad it was, but even so, I knew I had just watched some grade-a bullshit. So it’s all the more intriguing AND satisfying to see you take it apart so damn well.

  2. Okay, not sure I follow the logic of why you don’t like Father’s Day, but everything else about this review was bang on target. You’re right about the idea that a baby conceived in the Tardis would automaticallly become a Time Lord is stupid, however, I always considered that explanation as flannel, and that the real father of River Song was the Doctor himself. He just doesn’t know it because Amy got fucked by a version of the Matt Smith Doctor from the future. Consequently, the Doctor later married his daughter. Finally, thank you for mentioning The Reign of Terror as it allows me to link you to this: http://www.kaldorcity.com/features/articles/reign.html

    • Actually I dont hate Fathers Day (its one of the better eps in s1) its just Roses behaviour that I was complaining about.

      • Rose’s behaviour makes sense to me. If you loved your dad, and then you’re taken back in time to see the moment the poor chap is killed by a hit-and-run, are you just going to stand there and say “Oh, well, must think of the rest of the universe!” No. You’re going to save him and to do anything else would have made Rose look like a cold psychopath. Anyway, I’ve posted your review to Facebook, and so far it’s received a number of favourable comments. 🙂

      • Ooh cool, thanks 🙂 Link?

        I get Roses’s behaviour, it makes sense but at the same time she shoulda been punished by the show for it. What she did was far more dangerous than what Adam did and yet no punishment.

    • She didn’t become timelord from tardis flight. That just give silence scientist a headstart.

      • OTTER DE’ARC SAID: “She didn’t become timelord from tardis flight. That just give silence scientist a headstart.”

        THIS IS HOW THE DIALOGUE RUNS:

        LORIUM: They’ve been scanning her since she was born, and I think they found what they were looking for.
        DOCTOR: Human DNA.
        VASTRA: Look closer. Human plus. Specifically, human plus Time Lord….

        DOCTOR: But she’s human. She’s Amy and Rory’s daughter.
        VASTRA: You’ve told me about your people. They became what they did through prolonged exposure to the time vortex. The Untempered Schism.
        DOCTOR: Over billions of years. It didn’t just happen.
        VASTRA: So how close is she? Could she even regenerate?
        DOCTOR: No, no. I don’t think so.
        VASTRA: You don’t sound so sure.

        WE LATER DISCOVER THAT RIVER SONG CAN REGENERATE.

        DOCTOR: Because I don’t understand how this happened.
        VASTRA: Which leads me to ask when did it happen?
        DOCTOR: When?
        VASTRA: I am trying to be delicate. I know how you can blush. When did this baby begin?
        DOCTOR: Oh, you mean…
        VASTRA: Quite.
        DOCTOR: Well, how would I know? That’s all human-y, private stuff. It just sort of goes on. They don’t put up a balloon, or anything.
        VASTRA: But could the child have begun on the Tardis in flight, in the vortex?
        DOCTOR: No! No! Impossible! It’s all running about, sexy fish vampires and blowing up stuff. And Rory wasn’t even there at the beginning. Then he was dead, then he didn’t exist, then he was plastic. Then I had to reboot the whole universe. Long story. So, technically the first time they were on the Tardis together in this version of reality, was on their w…
        VASTRA: On their what?
        DOCTOR: On their wedding night.

        DOCTOR: It doesn’t make sense. You can’t just cook yourself a Time Lord.
        VASTRA: Of course not. But you gave them one hell of a start, and they’ve been working very hard ever since.

        HOWEVER,THIS LAST BIT FROM VASTRA ABOUT HOW THEY WERE GIVEN “one hell of a start, and they’ve been working very hard ever since,” IS PURE SPECULATION THAT COMES OUT OF NOWHERE. IT ALSO APPEARS TO CONTRADICT LORIUM WHEN SHE SAYS, “They’ve been scanning her since she was born, and I think they found what they were looking for.”

        CONSEQUENTLY, IF THE DOCTOR IS RIGHT, AND “It doesn’t make sense. You can’t just cook yourself a Time Lord,” THEN THE ONLY ALTERNATIVE IS THAT A FUTURE VERSION OF MATT SMITH’S DOCTOR CAME BACK IN TIME AND HAD HIS WAY WITH AMY. THAT WOULD ALSO EXPLAIN THESE EXCHANGES FROM THE IMPOSSIBLE ASTRONAUT:

        SILENCE: Your name is Amelia. You will tell the Doctor.
        AMY: Tell him what?
        SILENCE: What he must know and what he must never know.
        AMY: How do you know about that?
        SILENCE: Tell him.

        SO WHAT IS THIS MYSTERIOUS THING AMY BELIEVES SHE HAS TO TELL THE DOCTOR?

        AMY: Doctor, I need to tell you something. I have to tell you it now.
        DOCTOR: Not a great moment.
        AMY: No, it’s important. It has to be now.
        GIRL [OC]: Help! Help me! Help me!
        AMY: Doctor, I’m pregnant.

        WHY THE URGENCY TO TELL THE DOCTOR SHE IS PREGNANT, UNLESS THE DOCTOR IS THE FATHER?

      • Diamanda said: “I get Roses’s behaviour, it makes sense but at the same time she shoulda been punished by the show for it. What she did was far more dangerous than what Adam did and yet no punishment.”

        Adam’s behaviour was an act of selfish greed, in that he stole technical information from the future to financially enrich himself. That’s why he was punished. Rose, on the other hand, acted out of compassion for her father. You should judge people on their motives, not for the unforeseen consequences of their actions.

    • I know a friend who, even though he’s a huge fan of 9, he never liked “Father’s Day” and use to call it his personal worst for the longest time, and he did have a reason for it. He just thought it was too depressing for him. I rewatched it after he said that, and even though I’m in no way a fan of “Father’s Day,” I can’t see too much of his opinion in the episode. Nowadays, he finally rewatched “The Twin Dilemma ” with me for my first view, only because I ruined his copy of “The Five Doctors” special edition disc. We both ran to the bus while he destroyed “The Twin Dilemma” by scrapping it on the floor. Good times!

  3. Only being a casual Who fan (only watched the new stuff,) I’d been very confused by this episode as the “army” seemed every bit to be “here’s some characters you’re all familiar with” yet I couldn’t recall seeing them before. So they were introduced just in time to relevant after all. And maybe it was just the snippits shown in this review, but it hadn’t struck me before who obnoxiously gay couples get presented in this show. Smacks very much of not being as clever as the writer thinks it is, which just makes them obnoxious.

    • I don’t think the fact that the gay couple come over obnoxious is an error in the writing.

  4. Looms is bullshit idea from one bullshit book that was contradicted by just about everything else.
    Just a friendly reminder.

    • Disagreee its bullshit but I know its just in my personal canon of Who. The Twatty Who’s are mercilessly from my POV. Yeah they also did some work on River but its still stupid, TARDIS conception as a headstart for a Timelord? Ridiculous.

      • Not more rediculous than that Susan had fully human son from human husband somehow. It’s all very ishy with genetics in who.

        And why not a headstart? Timelords are not the first one who came up with regeneration since they’ve stole technology from great vampires. Some vortex radiation or whatever shenanigans should come in play somehow sooner or later.

    • Otter d’Arc: “Not more rediculous than that Susan had fully human son from human husband somehow. It’s all very ishy with genetics in who.”

      The idea that Susan had a son comes from a Big Finish audio, and itself is contradicted by the BBC book Legacy of the Daleks, which states that she was unable to concieve any children with David Campbell.

      I can’t really see how this can be used as evidence for anything.

      • Since “night of the doctor” in tv canon, bfa has a little more weight over nu!who than books.

      • Otter d’Arc said “Since “night of the doctor” in tv canon, bfa has a little more weight over nu!who than books.”

        Charley, C’rizz, Lucie, Tamsin and Molly, were names mentioned in “Night of the Doctor,” but that only means that the Eight Doctor knew some people who were called by these names, not that these were necessarily the same characters that appeared in the BF productions. Consequently, it cannot be used to justify the view that Susan having a son should be considered a legitimate part of the Doctor Who programme as recognised by the vast majority of Doctor Who fans who don’t listen to BF audios. Finally, as BBC books made next to no attempt to follow Virgin continuity, and as BF follows neither, it should also be pointed out that although TV Doctor Who may cherry pick ideas that have previously appeared in the latter forums, no serious attempt has ever been made to link up with their continuity, or even acknowledge their existence. Indeed, Doctor Who isn’t and never has been a continuity show. For Doctor Who canon does not exist.

      • You do have a point Alan. After reading what you have just said, as well as looking back at the past several seasons in the show, I just think that it is best that Doctor Who never had a true, fixed cannon. Sure, Diamanda thinks that looms are acceptable to her, but for me, I have seen some stories in the classic show where the Doctor has admitted to having a family and also said that he was born. But even she said that we are free to make up our own cannon, depending on what we like best. I ca say that the TV movie is good enough to be accepted in my personal cannon with the whole series, or some people (there is one man who really told me this, but I will let some of you guess who it is, hehehe!) can simply see it as a reboot and not part of the classic series with New Who only thinking that it is part of the series as a whole. In other words,

      • javi1003 said: “Transgender issues?! Not even close.”

        That’s good to hear. 🙂

        “I was referring to her performance.”

        What was wrong with her performance, and why do you think it would have been better if she had played the Rani?

        “I just didn’t like the way how this incarnation turned out to be is all.”

        In what way?

        “I think the reason for why I never cared for Danny is because his character doesn’t appeal to me. For someone who use to be a soldier, he didn’t do much. Yeah, he disabled a robot in “The Caretaker” in a very stupid and impractical way, and he took command of the Cybermen, just to blow himself up with all of the Cybermen, but what else has he done?”

        Danny didn’t blow himself up with the Cybermen.

        “Sure, he taught kids, but that didn’t feel important to what he did in season 8. Not only that, but I wanted to see him do more soldier stuff in the show too. Most of the time, he was just there as a love interest for Clara,”

        I don’t think we’ve been watching the same show. The fact that Danny was a soldier, who accidentally shot dead a child, runs underneath everything Danny says and does. You appear to have wanted Danny to go around shooting people, like some two dimensional video game character, but that isn’t, and shouldn’t be, what Danny was all about. Basically his story goes like this:

        Rupert Pink was an orphan who was sent to a children’s Home. He was a lonely little boy who found it difficult to sleep at night because he was frightened of an imaginary monster. One day he was visited by Clara, who took out a tin of plastic soldiers and placed them under his bed, telling Rupert that they are there to keep him safe.

        CLARA: They’re going to guard under your bed. You see this one? This is the boss one, the colonel. He’s going to keep a special eye out.
        RUPERT: It’s broken, that one. It doesn’t have a gun.
        CLARA: That’s why he’s the boss. A soldier so brave he doesn’t need a gun. He can keep the whole world safe. What shall we call him?
        RUPERT: Dan.
        CLARA: Sorry?
        RUPERT: Dan, the soldier man. That’s what I call him.

        And when Rupert grew-up, he left the Children’s Home, changed his name to Dan and jointed the army, so basically switching one regimented regime, where he was told what to do, for another. Dan enjoyed being in the army, it made him feel that he was part of a strong, positive force, and he didn’t have to think too much, just have faith in his superiors and obey orders.

        However, while on a tour of duty in Afghanistan, Dan accidentally shot dead a little boy. This had a major impact on Dan as he had seen his role as someone who was there to fight the monsters and protect the innocent and yet joining the army had lead to him killing a child. Now it seemed that he was the monster.

        Dan decided to rethink his life, he no longer wanted to be Dan, the soldier man, so instead became Danny the school teacher. However, Danny still experienced a terrible haunting guilt, and eventually, the only way he felt he could cope, was to blame other people for the child’s death.

        Danny decided that the ones responsible had been his military superiors, the soldiers whose job it had been to keep the whole world safe… the majors, the generals… and the colonels. The reason they didn’t use guns was because they could command others to do the shooting for them. He hadn’t been Dan, the soldier man at all. He had been Dan the squaddie and he had been let down and betrayed by the people whose job it was to keep a special eye out and stop bad things from happening.

        Then one day Danny met Clara and she introduced him to the Doctor, a man who was so brave he didn’t need a gun, and who kept a special eye out for monsters and made the whole world safe.

        And Danny hated him.

        “Is Danny Pink, in any way, a character I can care for? To me, I don’t see myself remembering him in the next 2-3 years.”

        I’ll remember him. Dan the Cyberman, who asked for his feelings to be switched off, because having them was just too painful.

      • By this flawed logic you could say nothing is canon. And every story just have some bloke called the Doctor but in reality it’s always different universe. And whenever he mentions someone it’s surely someone else.

      • Otter d’Arc said “By this flawed logic you could say nothing is canon. And every story just have some bloke called the Doctor but in reality it’s always different universe. And whenever he mentions someone it’s surely someone else.”

        It isn’t flawed logic at all. Nothing in Doctor Who is canon. Indeed, the fact that time in Doctor Who can be rewritten, means that the show is constantly in a state of flux. And every story does just have some block called the Doctor in it. Hartnell, Troughton, Pertwee etc. they are all different actors playing the part in a different way to their predecessors, with stories scripted/directer/produced by different people. A show can only have a canon if the writers specifically set out to create a cohesive whole. This has clearly not happened with Doctor Who. So if there’s no pattern there, you can’t invoke one.

  5. say what you want about RTD but he would’ve definitely followed up on the whole lost baby situation.

    Moffat really likes the idea of a gathering of various enemies/allies from the whoniverse, he’s did it once every year. It’s unfortunately an idea that can only be done in other media or at least when then budget is raised, like an anniversary special.

  6. I’m supporting your rage against anyone becoming a Timelord from birth in a TARDIS. Even when I first watched this episode I thought that was just stupid. As for the title of the meteor itself does not make any sense. Even if it was called “Demons Run” it would still make it sound incredibly stupid. Actually, come to think about it, the silence are already stupid. So I find that title believable anyway.

    Yes, Davies did start the whole season long story arc, but Moffat seems to have such a weird fascination that these story arcs should last longer than necessary. If you don’t know what I mean, then go watch “Time of the Doctor.” But that wasn’t his worst story arc. To me, the Missy story arc (at least that’s what I call it) did not need to be a story arc at all. My biggest problem with his story arcs is that he seems to think that making sudden mentions of the main story that he is trying to tell works. But what I don’t he knows is that what he really is doing is dragging the story to the point that you don’t care anymore. Your interest dies as the story goes along, and your only anticipation is when it’s all going to end. Most of the time, he barely mentions them to extend it into more than 2 seasons or 3, but when it all does come full circle, you came to the point where you ask yourself “are we still on about this?!”

    As for the headless monks, even if the rumors were true that captain Jack was suppose to be in this episode as one of the headless monks to explain the face of Bo, it still wouldn’t help that moment, since that whole scene would still be cluttered with unanswered questions and the stupidity that surrounds it all.

    Even if the Cybermen weren’t the ones that Rory faced against in this episode, him dressed up as a Roman soldier still wouldn’t have worked. That guy would have been decked in the shnaz with laser guns, unless if they’re too stupid to use their guns, like the Cybermen.

    As a whole, I don’t care for this episode at all. The story doesn’t hold my interest, it raises more questions than answers, the characters are insufferable, and I’m glad that in 3 episodes after this one, we got ourselves an episode that I can consider to be a masterpiece, “The Girl Who Waited.”

    • y javi1003 said: “To me, the Missy story arc (at least that’s what I call it) did not need to be a story arc at all.”

      Well, it wasn’t a story arc in the first place.

      • Yeah. That’s my point. But Moffat treated it as if it was to begin with. As if story arcs really work like that.

      • I don’t think he did. The story arc in season 8 revolves around Clara, Danny and the Doctor, not Missy.

      • Two things:

        1. Danny’s character felt so lost, so uninteresting, that not even this season gave too much thought about him. “Dark Water/Death in Heaven” both felt like they knew that Danny wasn’t suppose to stay very long, but also realize that there has to be a conclusion for him.

        2. Missy and the promise land was shown and referenced in almost every episode before “Dark Water,” trying to lead up to what is in store with the Master, or who I would like to call her “THE-ONE-WHO-WAS-COULD-OF-AND-SHOULD-HAVE-BEEN-THE-RANI-AND-SHOULD-NEVER-HAVE-TOUCHED-THE-ROLE-OF-THE-MASTER!!!!!!!!!” So, yeah. Even though Danny had more screen time than Missy, his character still had very little to offer in the season as a whole. Not only that, but he was treated very badly from Clara in his date in “Listen”, lied to by Clara, even after she promised him not to lie about anything the Doctor does with her in “The Caretaker,” and then……………..Actually, no. That’s about all I have to say about Danny. He and Missy were a complete waste of my time up until “Dark Water.”

      • javi1003 said “Danny’s character felt so lost, so uninteresting, that not even this season gave too much thought about him. “Dark Water/Death in Heaven” both felt like they knew that Danny wasn’t suppose to stay very long, but also realize that there has to be a conclusion for him.”

        Danny’s character didn’t seem remotely lost, and according to the amount of comments being made about him at the time on the internet, he was generating a lot of interest. Don’t really understand your comments about “Dark Water/Death in Heaven”, in that it seemed to fit perfectly with Danny’s character.

        “2. Missy and the promise land was shown and referenced in almost every episode before “Dark Water,”

        They get referenced in 8 of the 13 episodes.

        “trying to lead up to what is in store with the Master,”

        Again, I don’t agree. A series of short scenes of Missy or Seb saying a couple of cryptic lines does not constitute an arc, in the same way that mentioning “Bad Wolf,” or “Torchwood” throughout a season is not an arc. It’s placement, if you want to call it anything. The arc of season 8 (which concluded in Last Christmas) was the relationship triangle between Danny, the Doctor and Clara.

        “or who I would like to call her “THE-ONE-WHO-WAS-COULD-OF-AND-SHOULD-HAVE-BEEN-THE-RANI-AND-SHOULD-NEVER-HAVE-TOUCHED-THE-ROLE-OF-THE-MASTER!!!!!!!!!””

        Sounds like you have some transgender issues. 😦 As for the Rani returning, we haven’t seen the character for over twenty years, which means that the majority of the Nu Who audience would be saying “who the hell is that?” if Missy had turned out to be the Rani in “Dark Water.” Equally, we’d then have to explain to them that the Rani was this poorly written character, who was originally meant as an ill conceived replacement for the Master, and who had previously appeared in three dreadful Doctor Who stories, namely, “The Mark of the Rani,” “Time and that Rani” and “Dimensions in Time.”

        “So, yeah. Even though Danny had more screen time than Missy, his character still had very little to offer in the season as a whole.”

        His character was the main driver for the whole season.

        “Not only that, but he was treated very badly from Clara in his date in “Listen”, lied to by Clara, even after she promised him not to lie about anything the Doctor does with her in “The Caretaker,” and then……………..”

        So, contrary to what what you say above, Danny did have an impact on the events of season 8 after all.

        “He and Missy were a complete waste of my time up until “Dark Water.””

        Well, if you feel it’s a waste of your time, perhaps you instead should just go back and watching the Rani trifecta on a continual loop?

      • Transgender issues?! Not even close. I was referring to her performance. I know she has fans, so I won’t ignore that, and I have nothing wrong with timelords changing their genders either. I have mentioned it before that I was all up for that change since the first time I heard about the possibilities of the Doctor being played as a woman. I just didn’t like the way how this incarnation turned out to be is all.

        As for Danny, I can tell that you have struggled to understand my issue with him. That’s because, even though I don’t care for him, explaining my reasons can be complex. But understanding my point of views on this show was already problematic for some anyway :P. I think the reason for why I never cared for Danny is because his character doesn’t appeal to me. For someone who use to be a soldier, he didn’t do much. Yeah, he disabled a robot in “The Caretaker” in a very stupid and impractical way, and he took command of the Cybermen, just to blow himself up with all of the Cybermen, but what else has he done? Sure, he taught kids, but that didn’t feel important to what he did in season 8. Not only that, but I wanted to see him do more soldier stuff in the show too. Most of the time, he was just there as a love interest for Clara, but even in those moments they weren’t very good. Not as bad as the “love relationship” between Rose and Mickey, but it came very close, especially for the date scene in “Listen,” which I will review one day. And for now, I want to ask you a question, a very sincere question. Is Danny Pink, in any way, a character I can care for? To me, I don’t see myself remembering him in the next 2-3 years.

      • Sorry, but I appear to have posted my response to Javi003’s above post in the wrong thread. I’ll posted it again here, and hope that Diamanda will delete the duplicate.

      • javi1003 said: “Transgender issues?! Not even close.”

        That’s good to hear. 🙂

        “I was referring to her performance.”

        What was wrong with her performance, and why do you think it would have been better if she had played the Rani?

        “I just didn’t like the way how this incarnation turned out to be is all.”

        In what way?

        “I think the reason for why I never cared for Danny is because his character doesn’t appeal to me. For someone who use to be a soldier, he didn’t do much. Yeah, he disabled a robot in “The Caretaker” in a very stupid and impractical way, and he took command of the Cybermen, just to blow himself up with all of the Cybermen, but what else has he done?”

        Danny didn’t blow himself up with the Cybermen.

        “Sure, he taught kids, but that didn’t feel important to what he did in season 8. Not only that, but I wanted to see him do more soldier stuff in the show too. Most of the time, he was just there as a love interest for Clara,”

        I don’t think we’ve been watching the same show. The fact that Danny was a soldier, who accidentally shot dead a child, runs underneath everything Danny says and does. You appear to have wanted Danny to go around shooting people, like some two dimensional video game character, but that isn’t, and shouldn’t be, what Danny was all about. Basically his story goes like this:

        Rupert Pink was an orphan who was sent to a children’s Home. He was a lonely little boy who found it difficult to sleep at night because he was frightened of an imaginary monster. One day he was visited by Clara, who took out a tin of plastic soldiers and placed them under his bed, telling Rupert that they are there to keep him safe.

        CLARA: They’re going to guard under your bed. You see this one? This is the boss one, the colonel. He’s going to keep a special eye out.
        RUPERT: It’s broken, that one. It doesn’t have a gun.
        CLARA: That’s why he’s the boss. A soldier so brave he doesn’t need a gun. He can keep the whole world safe. What shall we call him?
        RUPERT: Dan.
        CLARA: Sorry?
        RUPERT: Dan, the soldier man. That’s what I call him.

        And when Rupert grew-up, he left the Children’s Home, changed his name to Dan and jointed the army, so basically switching one regimented regime, where he was told what to do, for another. Dan enjoyed being in the army, it made him feel that he was part of a strong, positive force, and he didn’t have to think too much, just have faith in his superiors and obey orders.

        However, while on a tour of duty in Afghanistan, Dan accidentally shot dead a little boy. This had a major impact on Dan as he had seen his role as someone who was there to fight the monsters and protect the innocent and yet joining the army had lead to him killing a child. Now it seemed that he was the monster.

        Dan decided to rethink his life, he no longer wanted to be Dan, the soldier man, so instead became Danny the school teacher. However, Danny still experienced a terrible haunting guilt, and eventually, the only way he felt he could cope, was to blame other people for the child’s death.

        Danny decided that the ones responsible had been his military superiors, the soldiers whose job it had been to keep the whole world safe… the majors, the generals… and the colonels. The reason they didn’t use guns was because they could command others to do the shooting for them. He hadn’t been Dan, the soldier man at all. He had been Dan the squaddie and he had been let down and betrayed by the people whose job it was to keep a special eye out and stop bad things from happening.

        Then one day Danny met Clara and she introduced him to the Doctor, a man who was so brave he didn’t need a gun, and who kept a special eye out for monsters and made the whole world safe.

        And Danny hated him.

        “Is Danny Pink, in any way, a character I can care for? To me, I don’t see myself remembering him in the next 2-3 years.”

        I’ll remember him. Dan the Cyberman, who asked for his feelings to be switched off, because having them was just too painful.

      • My problem with this Master is, well, even though she is not AS BAD as John Simms, I was really looking forward to seeing another incarnation that was as dark and sinister as either Derek Jacobi, Roger Delgado, or even Anthony Ainley. My reason for why I lean towards those incarnations is because, to my opinion, they are what I should see from the Master. But when you have the Master bleach his hair, fly down from the sky like Merry Poppins, dance around as 99.99% of the human population, or even sing this:

        Then you kind of lost me there. Nothing against having humor from a villain. Missy, as well as Simms, just doesn’t do it for me for those reasons.

      • Javil1003 said “My problem with this Master is, well, even though she is not AS BAD as John Simms, I was really looking forward to seeing another incarnation that was as dark and sinister as either Derek Jacobi, Roger Delgado, or even Anthony Ainley.”

        I don’t see Derek Jacobi, Roger Delgado or Anthony Ainley’s version of the Master as “dark and sinister”. However, I do think they are morons. For example:

        1/ I “Utopia” the Derek Jacobi Master presumably decided to hid from the Daleks by using a Chameleon Arch to turn himself human, however this has three major problems 1/ This wouldn’t save him, as the Daleks kill or enslave humans on sight 2/ There was no reason why he couldn’t allow himself to still know he was really the Master 3/ He failed to put any mechanism in place that would allow himself to remember he was the Master.

        2/ In “The Mind of Evil” the Roger Delgado version of the Master tried to spark off a world wide nuclear war even though he didn’t
        have access to a working Tardis and was stranded on Earth himself.

        3/ In “The Mark of The Rani” the Anthony Ainley Master spent years standing in a field dressed as a scarecrow in the hope that the Doctor’s Tardis would turn up one day.

        ” My reason for why I lean towards those incarnations is because, to my opinion, they are what I should see from the Master.”

        What? Total stupidity?

        “But when you have the Master bleach his hair, fly down from the sky like Merry Poppins, dance around as 99.99% of the human population,”

        Er… the Michelle Gomez version of the Master didn’t bleach her hair blond or dance around as 99.99% of the human population. I think you’re getting a bit confused with the John Simm version, who was a product of the RTD era of the show, and consequently has little to do with the version of the Master we have now.

      • But do you at least understand what I want from the Master?

      • Javi1003 said “But do you at least understand what I want from the Master?”

        Yes. Pantomime stupidity and a penis.

      • To be fair we got pantomime stupidity from Gomez’s Master. And maybe a penis too (no evidence either way!)

      • Diamanda said “To be fair we got pantomime stupidity from Gomez’s Master.”

        I don’t agree. Everything the Master does in season 8 is well thought out and makes perfect sense.

        “And maybe a penis too (no evidence either way!)”

        The fact the Master is played by Michelle Gomez would suggest otherwise. 😉

      • ‘The fact the Master is played by Michelle Gomez would suggest otherwise.’ Tad cissexualist there:p

      • Cissexualist? As they cast Michelle Gomez as the Master then that would suggest he had regenerated into a woman and was happy with the change.

      • Cissexualist as in forgetting that there are many real-life human women with penis’s. And that we dont know what Gallifreyan junk looks like:P

      • Diamanda said: “Cissexualist as in forgetting that there are many real-life human women with penis’s.”

        So you’re sayng Michelle Gomez has a penis and that’s why Moffat cast her as the Master? First I’ve heard of it. Have you got a link?

        “And that we dont know what Gallifreyan junk looks like:P”

        I think we do, otherwise Clara’s family wouldn’t have reacted in the way they did in “The Time of the Doctor” when Matt Smith’s Doctor turned up naked at their Christmas dinner.

      • You have a point on the times the Docs been naked and no-one commenting (but they coulda just been polite:P) but my point about The Master stands, women having vulvas are not the rule its just common*

        *I dunno why you’d think it was a comment on Michelle Gomez, unless you think she really has 2 hearts and used to be John Simm.

      • Diamanda said “You have a point on the times the Docs been naked and no-one commenting (but they coulda just been polite:P)”

        When the Doctor turns up naked at Clara’s Chrismas dinner, her parents look embarrassed, except for the grandmother, who looks interested. If think, if the Doctor had been like Action Man down there, they would have reacted in a different way.

        “but my point about The Master stands, women having vulvas are not the rule its just common*

        But I don’t see how this relates to the Master. In Dark Water/Death in Heaven all we have is Missy saying she used to be called the Master. Therefore, the obvious conclusion to draw is that the Master has now decided he wants to be a woman with a vagina. The fact that the part is played by Michelle Gomez and not say, Jamie Lee Curtis, would suggest thet the intention of the production team was to imply that the Master no longer had a dick.

        “I dunno why you’d think it was a comment on Michelle Gomez, unless you think she really has 2 hearts and used to be John Simm.”

        See above.

  7. I eagerly await when you’ll do 12th Doctor stuff for Twatty Who. Any hints as to when you plan to do that? IIRC when I listened to your podcast with Omega, you mentioned Kill the Moon and In the Forest of the Night as subjects in the future.

    And it’s totally not because 12th Doctor is my first Doctor and Series 8 is my first series and I also agree that those two episodes are pretty much the worst of Series 8. No siree…

  8. At the begin of this review I was questioning if I had really watched this episode. “Flash double controlled through time and space? Church army stormtroopers? Badly named space base? I don’t recall any of those things!” Some of the elements of this episode were both stupid and unmemorable enough to vanish from my mind.

    On a side note, I’m surprise you didn’t mentioned how much time this episode spend insinuating the Doctor had a case with Amy.

  9. I love these!

  10. mmm, I really don’t remember any of this episode 😮
    I just felt so sour and bitter after it, with the whole humans who want to kill the Doctor, baby talk and headless monks, that I erased it from my memory.

    Also the picture when you mentioned Trojan warriors, was that actually from the Myth Makers? Because if so, its gorgeous looking! It puts to shame the bland sets of this story and the Doctor’s daughter.

    • Its from a movie made in the 50s unfortunately good shots from the Myth Makers are few and far between (Its one of the most lost of the lost stories)

      • oh, that’s a shame :c

        Would be nice to find these lost ones, especially the historicals like Myth Makers or the Crusades. I have Crusades on audio and I think outshines a lot of New Who

      • The only reason I was able to properly appreciate Dimanda’s review of A Good Man Goes to War was because I just happened to have watched it again about 6 weeks ago. Prior to that I hadn’t seen it since its original broadcast in 2011, and I have to say, when viewing it back, I remembered almost nothing about it. It was like watching an episode I’d never seen before. I don’t know why it failed to leave any real impression on me. Maybe, as Diamanda suggests in her review, it was an episode that was more concerned with setting things up for the future story arc, than actually attempting to be a story in itself.

      • That’s a good point. Now that I’ve rewatched, it really does feel more like a plot device rather than an actual episode. Then again it does remind me a bit of Mission to the Unknown, which is sort of set up plot for Daleks Master Plan.
        Only it feels more intense than this, probably because of the tighter run time and more horror content.

        That being said maybe I’m just be cynical and just find more recent ( around the time after Donna lost her memories) New Who less memorable as the Classics :p

      • Mission to the Unknown may be a teaser, but it’s still a story in its own right.

  11. This was my #1 pick for worst episode of Doctor Who until Time of the Doctor came along and stole that title. Glad to see I’m not alone in loathing it.

  12. Eh, I still really like this episode.

  13. I have to admit, I really, really enjoyed the first ~10 minutes of this episode. I love Amy and Rory, and it’s so great whenever a companion gushes over a character who isn’t the Doctor.

    I really enjoyed Strax in this episode, as well. I’m not enough of a connoisseur of Classic era Sontarans to spot his portrayal being out of step with them, and the whole “serving honorably as a battlefield medic as punishment duty” set up seemed broadly in keeping with what I understand of Sontarans. Heck, maybe even a race of clones can change some of its social attitudes over the eons. And setting questions of good taste and not punching down in our humor aside (not that we should, I’m just saying for the purpose of this particular evaluation) his affably evil demeanor in this one is both more interesting and more entertaining than all the Mentally Impaired Sontaran jokes we get in his subsequent appearances.

    I also love Vastra and Jenny, though, so I’m clearly hopeless.

    But I have to ask: “The Curse of the Black Spot” is the worst episode of series six? Really? I mean, there’s some stuff I remember liking about that episode, and some stuff I remember being kinda bad. I enjoy those rare occasions when the Monster of the Week isn’t actually evil, just doing it’s thing in a way which causes problems for our heroes; and by this time, the Oh No, Rory’s Dead game had worn out its’ welcome. For the most part, though, I find “Curse” really unmemorable.

    Whereas “Let’s Kill Hitler!” isn’t just bad, it’s unforgettable. I mean, the Tesselecta was kind of a cool concept—with a lot more future story potential, than, say, the Weeping Angels—but the rest of the episode was just awash with angst, melodrama, teeth-gratingly irritating characters, and desperate attempts to wring suspense out of a situation where even clinically brain dead observers already know the outcome. It’s not just the worst episode of that series, and a contender for the worst episode of Moffat’s run, or the reboot show, it’s one of the worst episodes of any television show I’ve ever seen. (I should probably throw in a caveat here that I’ve never watched Bonekickers, or even Demons.)


Comments RSS TrackBack Identifier URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s